This week's article is all about the effectiveness of a coach. While perhaps a very broad topic, a coach's effectiveness massively impacts the degree to which players learn or take something from sessions. Here we'll look at three categories and how they can affect a coach's effectiveness.

Player Connection

This is one of the biggest one's for me and can make or break a coach. Just look at top level coaches like Jurgen Klopp and Pep Guardiola and the loyalty and admiration they draw from their players. Their connection and ability to bond with their players is paramount to their success not only as coaches, but also as managers. A player who feels valued and appreciated is that much more likely to be engaged and 'bought-in' to the coaches methodologies and training sessions.

Quality of Stoppages

For me, there is no set time limit on a stoppage or a coaching point. The thirty second rule might be a guideline for some, but it depends on the topic and the point you're getting across. If it's instructional or command style coaching: "This is what I'm looking for..." then work on getting those words down to a minimum and keep it succint.

One easy way to check if your coaching point is too long is to have them summarize what you just said in one sentence

If it's a longer stoppage (sometimes they're necessary) make sure that it's full of quality, engages the players and paints the right pictures. The players aren't here to hear me waffle on, they're here to play. One easy way to check if your coaching point is too long is to have them summarize what you just said in one sentence. If you've waffled on, they won't do this easily.

Understanding How Players Learn

  • Some players are visual learner's. They need to see someone do it.
  • Some players are auditory learners Explain it well enough and they'll do what you ask. 
  • And some are kinesthetic learners. They learn by doing and need to be given the freedom to try it.

Everyone learn's in different ways and most are a combination of all three so make sure they're all included.

  • For the visual players - do demo's - show them how it's done.
  • For the auditory learners - explain it to them. Keep it simple.
  • The the kinesthetic learners - embrace the silence. Sometimes it's ok to shut up and let them figure it out alone.
 I'm sure Zidane has no problem showing Arbeloa what he's looking for if he's not an auditory learner.

I'm sure Zidane has no problem showing Arbeloa what he's looking for if he's not an auditory learner.

Closing Thoughts

Being an effective coach is a sum of a million different parts. I'm sure it seeps into every aspect of the game and the art of coaching. But those little details, the marginal gains and little improvements in; connecting with your players, understanding how they learn, or the quality of your communication, can make all the difference.

 

Do you disagree with everything above? Are ex-pro's more or less effective than coaches that didn't play at the highest level? As always, I'd love to hear from you. Comments are below and you can find on me twitter: @deanatk

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